Remember These As Well

Some unconventional leaders to consider on Memorial Day

Remember These As Well

I have seen all week on many of the social media sites that I frequent, that it (Memorial Day) is “not about the BBQ.” And that is certainly true. Today is so much more than an excuse to frolic in the pool and eat as much red meat as possible.

It is easy to get caught up in the activities around Memorial Day and to forget exactly why the holiday was created: to honor those American men and women who died during combat. To put it as succinctly as I can, Memorial Day is for the American troops who didn’t get to come back home and drink a cold Coca-Cola at a homecoming party or march in a parade in their little hometown.

There are many out there like me that never wore the uniform of our Nation and never served on the battlefield. And I, like many, do not know with specificity the experiences and feelings that you have had. So, I will simply say “Thank you!” from one member of this grateful nation.

But, remember these as well

But, we would do well to remember some other fine examples of leadership. Two are no longer with us. And one is still alive today. We would do well to reflect on and remember some historic leaders outside of the U.S. Military that have made an impact on this world and on the cause of freedom, liberty, and prosperity. Consider just a few today.

Margaret Thatcher — She was was Britain’s first female prime minister. She was known for her tough uncompromising, conservative political views, and became nicknamed “The Iron Lady” as a term of both reverence and derision. She, along with Ronald Reagan, forged a relationship with Mikhail Gorbachev that brought the Cold War to a peaceful conclusion.

Consider these words from Margaret Thatcher. —

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Lincoln – An Uncommon Leader

When the Common Becomes the Uncommon

Lincoln - An Uncommon Leader

There is a lot of renewed interest in former presidents theses days. It has been said that THE greatest job in the world is the job of being the former President. I don’t suppose that I will ever have that job.

Abraham Lincoln and some other great Presidents are the topics of comparison and conversation lately. I heard on the radio today that every great President in history has been associated with a war in one way or another. George Washington – Commander in Chief of the Revolutionary War, Abraham Lincoln – The Civil War, Franklin Roosevelt – World War II, Ronald Reagan – The Cold War. But Lincoln’s name always seems to rise to the top of any list. So, what is the deal with Lincoln? Was he really the greatest president of all time?

A Common Beginning

History tells us that he was born in a log cabin in the frontier area of Kentucky. And that lifestyle was common for so many who were drawn to the frontier in hopes of making a life and owning a piece of land in the expanding federation of states that was the United States of America in the early 1800s. He grew up moving around the Ohio River Valley spending time in the states of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois.

Becoming an Uncommon Leader

Donald T. Phillips wrote a book in 1993 entitled, Lincoln on Leadership. The subtitle was Executive Strategies for Tough Times. In that book, he provides significant insight into leadership principles that Lincoln exhibited and cultivated in others.

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Leadership Profile: Fightin’ Joe Dunford

General Joe Dunford

It would be so easy to make this leadership profile all about a great military man.  Many of you may not know him.  Some of you may not have even heard his name before.   His nickname is “Fightin’ Joe” Dunford.

Gen. Joe Dunford was the Commander, U.S. Forces, Afghanistan.  He is a Marine four-star general and was the leader of NATO’s coalition in Afghanistan.  He “is probably the most complete warrior-statesman wearing a uniform today,” says a former Marine commandant.

That is high praise indeed.  And, in fact, today, he is the 36th commandant of the Marine Corps.  Having recently taken command as the 35th commandant retired.

In a recent article with Fortune magazine, Dunford tells the interviewer what his first battalion commander told him as a young Marine.  His battalion commander told him that there are three rules to success. The first? Surround yourself with good people. “Over the years,” says Dunford, “I’ve forgotten the other two.”

Why should I write a profile on “Fightin’ Joe Dunford?”

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